Nature Weaving Extension - Making Your Own Loom

Yesterday we explored the art of nature weaving on cardboard and today we will extend this by making our very own loom from twigs and/or branches.

When you and your whanau head out for a walk today try to collect items to weave on to your loom.


Materials

· Scissors

· Four twigs, sticks or branches

· String, Wool or Dental floss

· Long Plant Materials


Some questions you may ask yourself before you start collecting your natural resources.

· What sorts of items will you need?

· What sort of shape will work well for weaving?

· What sorts of textures and colours will you find/choose?

· Also, choose your four sticks on the walk. When you have all of your treasures head back home.


Directions

Step 1. Using the string, make a frame by attaching the twigs together at each corner. You can do this by winding the string around and knotting once it is securely fastened.


Step 2. Once your frame is finished, wind the string around the frame, looping on each end before continuing to the other side) until the frame has lines of string across it. Secure by knotting.


Step 3. With your plants part start weaving, passing the plant material under the string and then up and over the next string. Once the plant material is intertwined, gently push it up to the top of the loom, alternating colours and textures to create more interest.


Step 4. Continue to weave plants and move them up gently until the loom is filled.


You can also tie on a piece of string to the top back to use as a hanger.

Check out your finished result! Doesn’t it look amazing! However, as you may expect this will only look this good for about a day or two.

If you want something that will last longer, consider using more materials (like feathers, harakeke (flax), bits of bark, seed pods and grasses) that will not shrink or shrivel up.

Also, many flowers and herbs will dry nicely, though they may shrink up. You could at that point add in more and have something that will last a good while. Flowers and herbs that dry well include Lavender, Yarrow, Rosemary, Roses and Salvia.

Note: Again, this is a project that is all about process and attempting a different technique!


The finished project may not turn out the way you envisioned. That's ok!


Have fun whanau and friends!


Nature’s beauty is a gift that cultivates appreciation and gratitude —Louie Schwartzberg




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